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  1. Wisdom from HP: Choosing the Right Product Development Strategy Locked

    Research | Posted: 2004-06-02

    “Different business strategies demand different product development strategies; one size does not fit all.” This is the message from Hewlett-Packard’s (HP) Bill Crandall describing HP's approach to product development strategy. Drawing on HP’s experience from managing 17 multi-billion dollar product lines, Crandall explains how HP selects the right product development strategy for each business line in order to deliver the cost, quality, speed, and risk management required by the business strategy. (7 pages)

  2. Flexibility Powers QuantumÂ’s Thunderbolt Team to Market Locked

    Research | Posted: 2004-06-02

    Computer hardware manufacturer, Quantum, discovered that there is a direct correlation between shrinking product life cycles and the need for flexible, effective, quick-response cross-functional teamwork. This report provides an example of how to organize, staff and manage teams as product lifecycles quicken and as a product portfolio broadens and diversifies over time. (6 pages)

  3. Creating a Fast and Flexible Process: Empirical Research Suggests Keys to Success Locked

    Research | Posted: 2004-06-02

    Is a good project one that delivers to the spec or one that delivers to the market? Research conducted by Harvard Business School's Alan MacCormack suggests that most development processes seek to eliminate uncertainty, rather than learning how to deal with it. According to MacCormack, in an agile process, the very first question is "What type of uncertainty do we face?" He argues that the first phase of a project should not be concerned with product design but with process design. (5 pages)

  4. Applying Batch Size in Product Development: Unconventional Wisdom about Speed and Flexibility (Part Two of Two) Locked

    Research | Posted: 2004-06-02

    In part two of this interview, Reinertsen discusses the value of designing a process that can tolerate late changes. He also outlines how to create product development processes that combine discipline and flexibility. (5 pages)

  5. Embracing Ambiguity: MDS Sciex Pilots Rolling Wave Project Management to Facilitate Agile Product Development Locked

    Research | Posted: 2004-06-02

    How can a team create accurate plans and schedules in the face of an uncertain future – especially with projects that demand long lead times? Faced with the problem of prediction accuracy, MDS Sciex piloted the Rolling Wave approach to project management. The Rolling Wave methodology creates a window of highly detailed and accurate plans for near-term activity. Activities in the more distant future are given rough order-of-magnitude estimates but are not planned or scheduled in detail. MDS Sciex generated numerous expected and unexpected benefits from this fast and flexible approach to project planning. (7 pages)

  6. Intersolv Stays Ahead of the Pack with Tailored Software Development Cycle Locked

    Research | Posted: 2004-06-02

    Intersolv created a rapid software development process that enables each team to tailor the map to meet project needs. Intersolv’s eight-phase process, facilitated by a software development lifecycle champion, establishes discipline – without hamstringing the team. This report provides nuts and bolts detail about the inner workings of agile development processes. (6 pages)

  7. Applying Batch Size in Product Development: Unconventional Wisdom about Speed and Flexibility (Part One of Two) Locked

    Research | Posted: 2004-06-02

    In part one of this exclusive interview, Don Reinertsen explains how the concept of “batch size,” from the manufacturing domain, applies to product development. Reinertsen suggests that product developers reduce the batch size by which information is transferred from one point to another along the product development chain, thus increasing the quantity of information transfers. Reinertsen argues that developers do not need to know all of the requirements before beginning to design – they need to know only enough information to do useful work. (5 pages)

  8. Chaos Engineering Powers Conceptronic to Market Leadership Locked

    Research | Posted: 2004-06-02

    As development timeframes shrink, some environments can no longer afford to follow “classical” development processes with phases and gates, formal metrics, and design reviews. Conceptronic, a manufacturer of reflow ovens for PCBs, has pioneered CHAOS Engineering. CHAOS, an acronym for Complex Highly-Associative Ordered System, is a flexible process that generates a complex web of inter-relations between functions, suppliers and customers. Within this web, project leaders are free to draw on whatever resources and staffing they need to meet project needs. (5 pages)

  9. Developing Products in a Disruptive World Locked

    Research | Posted: 2004-06-02

    In this commentary, Don Reinertsen defines two approaches to disruption in technologies and markets: planning and reacting. While outlining the dynamics of reaction as a response to disruptive conditions, Reinertsen’s key point is that the ability to respond to disruption is not simply a strategic property. Many tactical decisions, which appear to be unimportant to senior managers, irrevocably determine whether a company will be able to respond quickly and efficiently to change. (3 pages)

  10. Intermec Steams to Market with Fast Prototyping Locked

    Research | Posted: 2004-06-01

    High-tech hardware creator, Intermec, used a combination of time-compression technologies, concurrent product development teams, and customer-reviewed prototypes, to rewrite their product development process – and slice six months off of a twenty-four month cycle time. By stressing concurrency as a process, as opposed to a technology, Intermec demonstrates the value of throwing away the rule book when you want to make a fresh start. (6 pages)

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