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  1. Bringing the Value of Lean to Product Development: Audio Session Transcript Locked

    Research | Posted: 2006-06-22

    In this presentation, Mark Thut of consultancy PRTM presents a comprehensive model for Lean product development (LPD). He presents empirical data arguing that product development organizations have reached the point of diminishing returns through the application of phase-gate processes, cross-functional teams and other traditional methods. As a result, many organizations have started to apply Lean principles to product development in order to reach the next level of capability. Thut presents a top-down model for LPD including common failure modes; a list of areas within product development where waste tends to creep in; a model for the various organizational levels at which LPD is applied; specific examples from Lean product development organizations, along with the measurable results they have achieved. Download the presentation slides (44 slides) here and then download the transcript below (20 pages).

  2. Lean Product Development:  A Framework & Overview Locked

    Research | Posted: 2005-12-29

    This secondary research report presents several different definitions of Lean Product Development derived from experts such as Michael Kennedy and Don Reinertsen. It reviews the roots of Lean in the Toyota Production System and discusses the relationship between that System and its extensions into the product development domain. The report concludes that, whatever their differences, the several definitions of Lean display a family resemblance centering on a sustained focus on eliminating waste and increasing efficiencies; a focus on customer value; a division of activities into value-added and non-value added; decision-making based on economics rather than abstract principles (e.g. “late changes are always bad,” “avoid rework”); and an emphasis on built-in learning and continuous improvement. (5 pages)

  3. The Impact of Lean Thinking: An Interview with Don Reinertsen Locked

    Research | Posted: 2005-12-28

    In this September 2005 interview, Don Reinertsen presents an overview of his approach to Lean. He discusses how mature insights from the manufacturing domain apply to product development and he explains the important differences between the two. Reinertsen demonstrates how the concept of "batch size" from the factory floor may be transferred to product development where outputs are less tangible. Finally, he discusses why Lean represents an opportunity for transformational change in product development, as well as some of the looming challenges to its implementation. This interview is an excellent introduction to Lean concepts from an experienced thought-leader.(6 pages)

  4. The Learning Cycle: SteelcaseĀ’s Journey from Lean Manufacturing to Lean Product Development Locked

    Research | Posted: 2005-12-16

    Tim Schipper currently serves as office lean consultant for Steelcase, based at its global headquarters in Grand Rapids, MI. Management Roundtable spoke with Schipper on the subject of Steelcase’s early efforts to adapt lean methodology to product development. Schipper reports on how the company has applied and extended lean principles from its manufacturing process to pilot projects elsewhere, notably information technology (IT). Based on the company’s experience with lean IT, Schipper also discusses Steelcase's early approach to applying lean to product development. (5 pages).

  5. Extending Lean Thinking to Innovation Locked

    Research | Posted: 2005-12-16

    An Interview with Bart Huthwaite, Institute for Lean InnovationIn this interview, MRT spoke with Bart Huthwaite, founder of the 22-year-old Institute for Lean Innovation, about the application of lean principles to innovation. Huthwaite presents some of the challenges to lean methodology as it made its way out of the factories and into upstream activities. Huthwaite discusses what he terms Lean (or Value) Innovation, which focus not only on driving waste out, but building the right value in, across several dimensions of the enterprise. He presents key drivers of innovation and outlines an approach for lean innovation based on six basic principles. Download the accompanying presentation slides (44 slides) here.(6 Pages)

  6. Knowledge Based Product & Process Development: An Executive Overview Locked

    Research | Posted: 2005-10-13

    Michael Gnam, Lean Product Development Initiative (LPDI) A LPDI project found that the pace of improvement in time-to-market for U.S. companies had slowed, while some companies elsewhere, such as Toyota, had continued to improve. The research team found that emulating "best practices" would not be sufficient to address the gap. The team chose to focus on paradigms not processes. The project examined the Toyota Production System and concluded that the essence of Lean is the effective management of knowledge. The study found that Toyota had very few tools and did not use many of the accepted "best practices" associated with Lean or any other methodology; what they had were numerous prototypes and parallel designs. There's often an assumption that structures - compliance with standards and detailed processes - create NPD excellence. Toyota, says this research, refutes that assumption. This report presents an overview of Lean while it demonstrates the important differences between "lean thinking" and business as usual. (39 pages)

  7. Lean Product Development: Transcript of Audio Session Locked

    Research | Posted: 2005-09-20

    In this transcript of a MRT member audio session, Anthony Carter, Director, Motorola, Kent Harmon of Targeted Convergence Corporation and Bob Wenning of TBM Consulting discussed how to apply Lean thinking to product development. They explained how to eliminate waste when outputs are intangible and suggested how Lean techniques could apply to the front-end of innovation. The panelists also presented approaches to Agile or Extreme Programming, for mapping decision-making, and for capturing the wealth of knowledge created during product development projects. This practitioner-focused discussion included numerous concrete tips and methods for applying Lean thinking to innovation and development. (17 pages)

  8. Lean Product Development: Summary of Audio Session Locked

    Research | Posted: 2005-09-20

    Related Links: Audio - mp3 or wma | Transcript (17 pages) In this summary of a MRT member audio session, Anthony Carter, Director, Motorola, Kent Harmon of Targeted Convergence Corporation and Bob Wenning of TBM Consulting discussed how to apply Lean thinking to product development. They explained how to eliminate waste when outputs are intangible and suggested how Lean techniques could apply to the front-end of innovation. The panelists also presented approaches to Agile or Extreme Programming, for mapping decision-making, and for capturing the wealth of knowledge created during product development projects. This practitioner-focused discussion included numerous concrete tips and methods for applying Lean thinking to innovation and development. (7 pages)

  9. A Disciplined Process for Innovation: Armstrong Clarifies the Fuzzy Front End with Marketplace Teams Locked

    Research | Posted: 2005-09-16

    This report summarizes a recent talk by Leslie Kulis, Director of Process Improvement at Armstrong World Industries’ international headquarters, on the subject of maximizing innovation through clarifying the “fuzzy front end” of development. Leslie discusses how Armstrong has increased its number of product launches in part by focusing on ways to generate and evaluate promising new product ideas. In particular, Leslie describes how Armstrong created local marketplace teams help keep new ideas in the “pipeline” before the company’s business divisions commit resources to development projects.Kulis also reports on the dashboards that help the company maintain a balanced product portfolio. In addition to the text-based summary below, click here to downloadpresentation slides (56 pages) related to this talk.(6 pages)

  10. Smart Developers, Dumb Metaphors Locked

    Research | Posted: 2005-09-09

    By Don Reinertsen, Reinertsen & Associates In this commentary, Lean expert Don Reinertsen argues that product developers are frequently imprisoned by inappropriate metaphors. Reinertsen suggests that descriptions of product development are often based on the notion of physical objects moving from "point A" to "point B." Such images as "the process map" or "the value stream" can be misleading since they assume a sequential series of tasks, like discrete points along a journey. Such metaphors ignore the fact that, unlike physical objects, information – "the stuff of product development" – can be in more than one place at a time. The author suggests that a more appropriate metaphor might be a portfolio of ideas, like a portfolio of stocks, where, as the project progressed, developers would cut their losses on ideas that proved more costly or less valuable than expected. (3 pages)

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