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  1. Driving Growth Through Product, Process And Strategy Innovation (Part Two of Two) Locked

    Research | Posted: 2004-07-14

    Robert Tucker is the author of the book, Driving Growth Through Innovation: How Leading Firms Are Transforming Their Futures, the result of a three-year study of more than 20 of the world's most innovative companies. Tucker’s thesis is that innovation is not a mystical quality that a firm possesses (or not) but a process that can be developed, learned, and improved upon. In the second portion of this two-part interview, Tucker discusses how to build innovation into an organization and how to measure its progress. (5 pages)

  2. Gary Hamel on Irrelevancy, Innovation, and Getting Silicon Valley Consciousness to Permeate your Organization Locked

    Research | Posted: 2004-07-14

    In this interview, Gary Hamel contends that innovation is a higher priority than efficiency. He claims that managers spend far more time on such activities as restructuring, mergers, enterprise resource planning, and reengineering than they spend on innovative ways to generate wealth. Hamel argues for a more open and creative environment where innovations can come from any level of the organization. In his view, to avoid irrelevancy, large, established firms must take on the “ethos” of a Silicon Valley startup – driven by passion and innovation. Hamel defends his thesis that competition no longer between products, but between business models, with reference to several companies with which he has worked. (6 pages)

  3. 3M Uses Lead User Research to Pursue Innovation Locked

    Research | Posted: 2004-07-14

    When 3M discovered they did not have the skills or technical and marketing personnel to develop a totally new business, they turned to Lead User research to help fill the void. Lead User research, pioneered by MIT’s Erich von Hippel, is a way to develop concepts for new and breakthrough products and services by learning from users who are ahead of the market. The process actively engages Lead Users in concept development. 3M used Lead User research to develop "breakthrough" new concepts for products or services; to improve current new product concepts and prototypes; to find new leading-edge markets and applications for new 3M technologies; and to generate new long-range growth strategies. This report describes how 3M created its own version of the Lead User process, who participated in the project, and how the process has spread to other areas of the corporation. (5 pages)

  4. Study of Pharmaceutical Industry: Large Firms Produce More Radical Innovations... Locked

    Research | Posted: 2004-07-14

    A study of the pharmaceutical industry finds that larger firms not only produce a greater number of truly revolutionary products, they also benefit more from them. The study examined 255 breakthrough innovations, introduced over a ten-year period, by 66 publicly traded pharmaceutical firms. It measured firm dominance using three dimensions: market share, assets and profits. The study found that the more dominant firms produced two-thirds of the radical innovations. Seventy percent of these innovations were invented and developed in-house. The study also revealed that dominant firms, on average, gained $500M in stock value in the first three days following FDA approval; smaller players averaged less than $50M in the same post-approval timeframe. (5 pages)

  5. Harvard Researcher Says Focus on Manufacturing Process Innovation holds Key to Faster High-Tech Product Success Locked

    Research | Posted: 2004-07-14

    When senior managers in some high-tech firms focus on product innovation to the exclusion of manufacturing process innovation, thinking they're being cost conscious, they're committing a major strategic blunder says Harvard Business School technology and operations professor Gary Pisano. Based on a multi-year study of the practices of six multinational pharmaceutical and five biotechnology firms, Pisano thinks early focus on process technology is what distinguishes winners from also-rans. (5 pages)

  6. MIT’s Von Hippel on Innovation , Lead User Analysis, and Cutting Concept Development Time and Cost Locked

    Research | Posted: 2004-07-14

    When it comes to innovative product concepts, sometimes it's a waste of time and resources to try to understand current customer needs. That's the word from MIT's Eric von Hippel, whose pioneering research in new product innovation and the fuzzy front end gave us the idea of Lead Users. Lead users have two main characteristics: 1) they have needs that foreshadow general market demand and, 2) they are prone to innovate. Von Hippel claims that sometimes it's less expensive and more efficient to let your customers define the needs, limit yourself to offering solutions, and let the customers create their own design based on them. This report provides an overview of the Lead User concept and discusses where they can be found, and how the information they provide can improve concept development for breakthrough products. (5 pages)

  7. Solving the Innovator’s Dilemma Locked

    Research | Posted: 2004-07-14

    In his book, The Innovator’s Dilemma, Clayton Christensen, outlined how companies can become victimized by their own success. Successful companies can fall by the wayside if they are blind-sided by disruptive technologies that initially appeal to only a small segment, but eventually work their way into mainstream markets. This report presents a framework for solving this “dilemma” through a replicable process that has been implemented by such firms as Hewlett-Packard, Motorola and Johnson & Johnson. Tony Ulwick, the developer of this process, argues that most companies focus on offering solutions rather than on the underlying process that is close to the customer’s experience. Researchers capture customer requirements related to existing solutions rather than finding out customers’ desired outcomes. Ulwick’s process prompts developers to generate a list of these outcomes, to prioritize this list, and then to align desired outcomes with appropriate metrics. (7 pages)

  8. Tips from Teradyne on the Innovator's Dilemma Locked

    Research | Posted: 2004-07-14

    Boston-based Teradyne, Inc. was a leading player in the field of automatic test equipment for verifying silicon wafers and packaged chips for many applications. However, in the mid-1990s Teradyne faced a formidable challenge from disruptive technologies in both the hardware and software domains. Teradyne responded by spawning an entirely new group that developed a new product, targeting new customers, based on new assumptions. This group successfully met the competitive challenge, creating the fastest new product ramp in the history of the company to that point. The new group opened up lines of business and led to technological improvements in existing products. Along the way, Teradyne learned a number of important lessons about solving Clayton Christensen’s Innovator’s Dilemma. (6 pages)

  9. When Winners Get Blindsided by Success Locked

    Research | Posted: 2004-07-14

    In this interview, Clayton Christensen, author of The Innovator's Dilemma, describes how companies can do everything right and end up with little to show for it. One reason, explains Christensen, is “disruptive technologies” that answer challenges that current customers are not even aware of. Doing the “right thing,” for example, listening to customers, causes developers to miss important opportunities. Christensen calls this “the innovator's dilemma.” In this interview, Christensen provides examples of this dilemma – and indicates a few places companies might look to avoid being blindsided by success. (5 pages)

  10. Driving Growth Through Product, Process And Strategy Innovation (Part One of Two) Locked

    Research | Posted: 2004-07-14

    Robert Tucker is the author of the book, Driving Growth Through Innovation: How Leading Firms Are Transforming Their Futures, the result of a three-year study of more than 20 of the world's most innovative companies. Tucker’s thesis is that innovation is not a mystical quality that a firm possesses (or not) but a process that can be developed, learned, and improved upon. In the first portion of this two-part interview, Tucker demonstrates the importance of innovation as a growth strategy in the current marketplace, shares some of the characteristics of highly innovative firms, and discusses the distinction between product, process and strategy innovation. (5 pages)

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