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  1. Measuring the Value of Open Innovation: Metrics, NPV and ROI Locked

    Research | Posted: 2006-10-11

    A Presentation by Simon Hayes, Senior Director, Strategic Alliance, Cisco Systems Cisco Systems has created a comprehensive measurement system for Open Innovation projects and alliances. Cisco’s experience suggests that it is necessary, first, to have a consistent methodology for measuring business return – one that embraces all of the types of projects under the corporate umbrella. Cisco tracks the metrics at the project, alliance and alliance portfolio levels. According to Hayes, comprehensive NPV, across all of these levels, is the best measure when comparing one project with another. Including non-financial, strategic measures (e.g. early market entry or the opportunity to create a new standard) in your calculations is essential – it is difficult to quantify them, but estimating them is better than ignoring them. An up-to-date metrics dashboard allows for mid-course corrections, and Cisco has created an automated, frequently updated dashboard solution. Finally, it is necessary that everyone involved on both sides feel ownership over the metrics and are accountable for them. To be successful in strategic alliances, says Hayes, it is absolutely necessary to develop a sense of joint destiny with your partner. Download the presentation slides (19 pages) here and then download the text summary below.(6 pages)

  2. Turning on Your Innovation Light Bulb: Applying Thomas Edison's Five Competencies of Innovation to Your Business MP3 Locked

    Research | Posted: 2006-10-07

    MP3 download for the audio session "Innovate Like Edison," September 13, 2006.

  3. Using Technology Scouting to Stimulate Innovation: Keys to Focusing the Search Locked

    Research | Posted: 2006-08-31

    By Jay Paap, President, Paap AssociatesSuccessful technology scouting starts with the right definition of the need, argues Jay Paap in this feature article. To promote innovation, writes Paap, scouting must go beyond seeking sources of known technologies – it must seek out new technologies that provide novel approaches to the problems you face. Think in terms of the problem to be solved, not the technology you think will solve the problem, advises Paap. Define the problem in generic terms to make it easier to identify potential solutions and technological approaches used in other industries. If you’re concerned about missing disruptive technologies, look at changes in customer needs that drive the demand for new technologies. Focus is critical for effective scouting – but focus on the right things: the problems and needs that your technology intends to address. (7 pages)

  4. Held Hostage by Delayed Technology? Locked

    Research | Posted: 2006-08-25

    Don Reinertsen, President of Reinertsen & Associates For product developers, new technology can be our best friend or our worst enemy. It can be an unparalleled tool to improve product performance. An inelegant design using new technology often outperforms even the most brilliant design using old technology. Unfortunately, new technology has a dark side, introducing uncertainty into schedule and performance goals. Since a project can be as uncertain as its most uncertain element, the entire project schedule can be contaminated by the uncertainty of a single underlying technology. In this brief article, Don Reinertsen argues that the key is to keep technology off the critical path. He presents severalways of pursuing this strategyas well as an analytic approach for articulating the economic argument. (3 pages)

  5. Open Innovation and Metrics: Designing Partnerships for Measurability Locked

    Research | Posted: 2006-08-09

    An Interview with Wayne Mackey, principal consultant, PDC Inc. In this August 2006 interview, consultant and metrics expert Wayne Mackey, a principal consultant with Product Development Consulting, Inc., discusses the special challenges of measuring open innovation projects. Mackey’s research indicates that communication is the single most important focus for open innovation metrics. Mackey discusses the different types of open innovation projects and where the levers of control reside in each case. Mackey also provides a framework for categorizing the roles and responsibilities on each side of the partnership and gives ten general metrics that form a starter list for measuring open innovation. Finally, Mackey generates a short list of “do’s” and “don’ts” for measuring open innovation projects. Mackey’s work suggests that best practice organizations are consciously designing partnerships for measurability. (7 pages)

  6. The Right I-Stuff: Intellectual Capital Management for Open Innovation Locked

    Research | Posted: 2006-06-28

    Sharon Oriel of Talisker and Associates, and formerly with The Dow Chemical Company, was an early co-founder of the Intellectual Capital Managers Gathering. In this exclusive interview, Oriel discusses the evolution of capital management at Dow Chemical; the need for a precise terminology around intellectual assets; building questions about intangible assets into the product development process; managing knowledge flow in open innovation projects; the role of the legal department; and the global dimensions of managing intangible assets. (6 pages)

  7. The Clorox Model of Innovation Partnering: Transcript of Audio Session Locked

    Research | Posted: 2006-05-23

    This audio session with David Lowrance, Group Manager, Technology Brokerage, Clorox Company, presents a comprehensive process for Open Innovation. Lowrance discusses the strategic rationale behind Clorox’s innovation approach in its quest to maintain market share leadership in its categories. To execute its strategy, Clorox created an internal organization, called technology brokerage, which orchestrates the partnerships for the company, both internally and externally. Clorox also uses Win-balancing a tool to quantify and communicate the level of innovation delivered by a supplier. It allows Clorox to communicate that assessment openly, transparently, and over time, maximizing cross-organizational alignment. Clorox's Go deep process to assess a technology partner’s potential. The objective is to achieve a deep understanding of partner capabilities and technology for the purpose not only of identifying the right technology partners, but also to understand their fit with Clorox's technology platforms and business strategy. Lowrance also discusses Clorox’s creative approach to IP management. The transcript, below, follows the slides available here. (23 pages)

  8. The Clorox Model of Innovation Partnering: Summary of Audio Session Locked

    Research | Posted: 2006-05-23

    Related Links: Audio (mp3 13.5MB) | Transcript (23 pages) This audio session with David Lowrance, Group Manager, Technology Brokerage, Clorox Company, presents a comprehensive process for Open Innovation. Lowrance discusses the strategic rationale behind Clorox’s innovation approach in its quest to maintain market share leadership in its categories. To execute its strategy, Clorox created an internal organization, called technology brokerage, which orchestrates the partnerships for the company, both internally and externally. Clorox also uses Win-balancing a tool to quantify and communicate the level of innovation delivered by a supplier. It allows Clorox to communicate that assessment openly, transparently, and over time, maximizing cross-organizational alignment. Clorox's Go deep process to assess a technology partner’s potential. The objective is to achieve a deep understanding of partner capabilities and technology for the purpose not only of identifying the right technology partners, but also to understand their fit with Clorox's technology platforms and business strategy. Lowrance also discusses Clorox’s creative approach to IP management. The summary, below, along with the slides available here, provide case examples, an outline of key points, as well as an overview of the questions and answer session that followed Lowrance’s talk.(16 pages)

  9. Design as a Differentiator:  Summary of Audio Session Locked

    Research | Posted: 2006-02-24

    Related Links: Audio - mp3 or wma | Transcript (18 pages) In this summary of a member-only audio session, Lawrie Cunningham (Black & Decker), Peter Marks (Design Insight) and Design Continuum’s Harry West and Allan Cameron discuss design and its role in differentiating new products and services. The panel, among other topics, talked about the emotional responses that good design can elicit and the role that this plays in customer buying decisions; criteria for design quality; the best means of informing design; and the cost/benefit tradeoffs involved in outsourcing design. (7 pages)

  10. Design as a Differentiator:  Transcript of Audio Session Locked

    Research | Posted: 2006-02-24

    In this transcript of a member-only audio session, Lawrie Cunningham (Black & Decker), Peter Marks (Design Insight) and Design Continuum’s Harry West and Allan Cameron discuss design and its role as a differentiator. The panel, among other topics, talked about the emotional responses that good design can elicit and the role that this plays in customer buying decisions; criteria for design quality; the best means of informing design; and the cost/benefit tradeoffs involved in outsourcing design. (18 pages)

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