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  1. Merck’s Collaboration with WuXi PharmaTech, Shanghai Locked

    Research | Posted: 2007-05-04

    A presentation by David M. Stout, Ph.D., Director, Global Basic & Pre-clinical Sourcing, Merck Research LaboratoriesThe pharmaceutical industry is renowned for the complexity of its development process, its risky projects, and its low-yield product pipeline. With increasing pressures on the industry, many of the so-called “Big Pharma” firms have decided that they can’t afford not to outsource non-core activities. One example is Merck & Co., Inc., which has forged a mutually successful partnership with China-based WuXi PharmaTech, a Contract Research Organization with less than ten years in the field. This presentation details the development of Merck’s partnership with a supporting Chinese firm and how that relationship slowly evolved to greater degrees of trust and commitment. It first presents an overview of the drug discovery process and provides a rationale for outsourcing in general – and outsourcing to China in particular. The presentation discusses the business criteria used to assess partners and then recounts the case history of the projects Merck has engaged in with WuXi. Recently, these projects have included FTEs dedicated to Merck and the development of a site dedicated to Merck projects at WuXi’s Shanghai location.(21 pages)

  2. Open Innovation Networks: Creating and Managing an Ecosystem for Innovation: Audio Session Summary Locked

    Research | Posted: 2007-04-20

    Related Links: Audio | Transcript (24 pages) | Slides(42 slides) In this audio session, Mike Docherty, CEO of Venture2, provides an understanding of the role of innovation networks within open innovation. Docherty introduces a framework for creating and managing networks and offers insights on partnering for success. He defines five major types of innovation networks: peer-to-peer networks, supply-chain networks, internal networks, “feeder” networks (where a larger, centralized entity leverages external partners in a coordinated development effort) as well as less formal – but targeted – events and forums. He recommends designing networks with high-level strategic goals in mind and then balancing structure with the need to be flexible and adaptable, while allowing the networks to evolve over time. Open innovation, emphasizes Docherty, allows developers to look for intersections between unmet consumer needs, enabling technologies, and marketplace opportunities. Innovation networks are a way to increase the speed and frequency of identifying those intersections. (12 pages)

  3. Co-Development Across Cultures: A Process for Opportunity Identification and Associated Metrics Locked

    Research | Posted: 2007-04-05

    A Presentation by Masongo Moukwa, Vice President, Global Technology, Reichhold This slide presentation gives an overview of how Reichhold, a supplier of a wide range of resins to the composite and coating industries, developed a process to identify and assess technologies and products to fill its pipeline of opportunities and bring them to commercialization. Reviewing its past experience of transferring technology and products from other organizations, Reichhold developed a suite of metrics to ensure that new opportunities were properly identified and screened and that new technologies and products were integrated within company capabilities. This presentation examined cases of technology transfer from Reichhold’s parent company and detailed the metrics deployed. (29 pages)

  4. Co-Development Conference Highlights Intellectual Property, Shows Open Innovation a Maturing Strategy Locked

    Research | Posted: 2007-02-18

    A January 2007 conference on Co-Development moved the conversation about collaborative product development a notch forward. The conference participants and presenters took for granted that the business case for CoDev had been made. The focus has turned toward leveraging open innovation models and managing intellectual property (IP) around a core business strategy. Keynote speaker Henry Chesbrough, as well as other speakers from IBM, Kraft, Microsoft, Hewlett-Packard, Medtronics and others discussed such issues as the question of protecting and managing IP as a major building block of any open innovation opportunity; the growing range of open innovation options, various intellectual property strategies, and the business models that integrate both; developing a supplier capabilities matrix to help determine which suppliers showed greatest promise as co-development partners; forging an IP strategy to meet the challenge of creating a collaborative product based on customer experiences, and other issues around open innovation and IP. (5 pages) Related links: Special Report on Open Innovation Practices; CoDev Conference 2008

  5. Co-Developing Products in Asia Audio Session MP3 Locked

    Research | Posted: 2006-10-13

    MP3 Download of Co-Developing Products in Asia Audio Session

  6. Key Steps for Protecting IP in China Locked

    Research | Posted: 2006-09-22

    A Presentation by John Tao, Air Products & Chemicals, Inc. In this slide presentation (with text summary), John Tao provides Western companies with the cultural and historical background to help them make better choices with respect to protecting their Intellectual Property (IP) when doing business with China. Tao discusses China’s rapid economic growth and traces the parallel development of IP law. Tao covers the various types of IP and the level of enforcement Westerners should expect with regard to each of them. He also discusses types of IP claims,China's court structure, and preferred methods for conflict resolution. Finally, Tao advises Western companies to examine how the Chinese are protecting their own IP and to imitate their example. According to Tao, choosing the right partner, internal training, and limiting access to core IP to a need-to-know basis, are important keys to protecting IP in these rapidly emerging markets. (20 pages)

  7. Co-Innovating with National Labs Locked

    Research | Posted: 2006-09-11

    A Presentation by J. Susan Sprake (Los Alamos National Laboratories), New Business Development, Federal Laboratory Consortium Vice Chair In this graphical summary of a conference presentation, Susan Sprake, presents an overview of ways in which companies in the private sector can collaborate with publicly funded labs. The Federal Laboratory Consortium (FLC) organizes events, engages in education and communication as part of its mission to make the technology generated in National Labs more accessible to private enterprise. The document discusses the activities of the consortium and its organization; government technology licensing requirements; technology transfer mechanisms; partnering requirements; as well as the types of agreements entered into by private firms and national labs. Of special interest is the FLC’s locator service. This service is designed to help industry practitioners connect technology problems with the solutions available in national labs. With this free service, a firm in the private sector can form a question in detail, which is fielded by experts across the system of labs. (13 pages)

  8. Co-Developing Products in Asia: Audio Session Transcript Locked

    Research | Posted: 2006-08-18

    In this audio session, Lothar Katz, principal consultant at Leadership Crossroads and a former Vice President and General Manager at Texas Instruments, shares his insights into co-developing products with Asian partners. Based on empirical studies, Katz points out the key cultural differences – group-orientation, relationship to authority and attitude toward uncertainty – that are the most challenging when collaborating globally. Katz outlines the very significant differences between China, Korea, India, and Japan and how to best motivate teams based in these countries. The speaker also cites American cultural traits that might cause difficulties for Asian counterparts and touches on the question of protecting Intellectual Property. A Question & Answer session with practitioners provides examples of applying Katz’s principles to individual cases. (22 pages)

  9. Co-Developing Products in Asia: Audio Session Summary Locked

    Research | Posted: 2006-08-18

    Related Links: Slides (27 pages) | Transcript (22 pages) | Audio In this audio session, Lothar Katz, principal consultant at Leadership Crossroads and a former Vice President and General Manager at Texas Instruments, shares his insights into co-developing products with Asian partners. Based on empirical studies, Katz points out the key cultural differences – group-orientation, relationship to authority andattitude towarduncertainty – that are the most challenging when collaborating globally. Katz outlines the very significant differences between China, Korea, India, and Japan and how to best motivate teams based in these countries. The speaker also cites American cultural traits that might cause difficulties for Asian counterparts and touches on the question of protecting Intellectual Property. A Question & Answer session with practitioners provides examples of applying Katz’s principles to individual cases. (10 pages)

  10. The Right I-Stuff: Intellectual Capital Management for Open Innovation Locked

    Research | Posted: 2006-06-28

    Sharon Oriel of Talisker and Associates, and formerly with The Dow Chemical Company, was an early co-founder of the Intellectual Capital Managers Gathering. In this exclusive interview, Oriel discusses the evolution of capital management at Dow Chemical; the need for a precise terminology around intellectual assets; building questions about intangible assets into the product development process; managing knowledge flow in open innovation projects; the role of the legal department; and the global dimensions of managing intangible assets. (6 pages)

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