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Three Keys to Making Roadmapping Stick

Location: Your office

Date: Thursday, March 9, 2017

Time: 11:00am - 12:00pm ET

Fee: Complimentary

Overview

Jay PaapAs technology and product roadmapping become more widely used, organizations often find it is easier to introduce a roadmapping initiative than to make it part of ongoing management culture. Too many roadmapping programs fail to provide the hoped-for value when launched and are soon abandoned as just another management fad. 

It doesn’t have to be that way.

This complimentary webinar will tell you what to do instead. Drawing on over 40 years of experience helping organizations develop and deploy effective roadmapping programs, Dr. Jay Paap will share three key program features he has found critical to roadmapping adoption.

  1.  Motivated map builders – there needs to be a clear benefit to those building the maps, otherwise it is ‘just another exercise’.
  2. Accessible to users - if the roadmaps are not available and user friendly they will not be used.
  3. Pertinent to their purpose – there is no single map architecture that works across and within organizations, be flexible and adaptive when designing your program.

Jay is an internationally recognized expert on innovation and new product development and is one of Management Roundtable's most popular and top-rated speakers. He has led our two day in-depth workshop on Technology & Product Roadmapping for nearly a decade; attendees tell us their implementation results have been both significant and sustainable. (His next class is April 11-12 at the MIT Conference Center in Cambridge, MA).

 Join us for this insightful free webinar and learn about Jay’s proven approach to roadmapping and how to make it stick. 

 

Session Leaders

About the Instructor

Jay Paap is President of Paap Associates and is one of Management Roundtable’s most highly rated instructors. He also serves on the faculty of the Executive Program at The Sloan School (MIT), led executive workshops for the Industrial Relations Center at Caltech and Haas School, Cal Berkeley, is a Fellow of The Society of Competitive Intelligence Professionals, and a PDMA Certified New Product Development Professional. He received his Ph.D. from MIT’s Sloan School of Management with concentrations in technology management and organization design.

Dr. Paap is a much respected and sought-after speaker at workshops and conferences around the globe; he is the co-author of 'Anticipating Disruptive Innovation' which received the Maurice Holland award as the best practice article in Research Technology Management.

He has been active in the management of technology for almost 50 years, and has consulted with industrial and governmental organizations for over 40 years. Prior to founding Paap Associates, Jay was Partner at Data and Strategies Group, Principal at Ampersand Ventures, Director of Corporate Consulting at Venture Economics, and Associate Director of the Technology Management Group at Pugh-Roberts Associates. Before entering consulting, Jay was an officer in the US Air Force, responsible for developing and deploying advanced electronics equipment.

In 1992 he founded and ran the Commercialization Roundtable in which senior business development managers from major companies met every two or three months through 1995 to share experiences on open innovation and develop best practices concerning how major corporations can effectively commercialize new technology based concepts and businesses. Among the members of the Roundtable were AT&T, Digital, Dow, DuPont, GTE, IBM, MCC, Motorola, and Xerox.

 

What you will learn

Drawing on over 40 years of experience helping organizations develop and deploy effective roadmapping programs, Dr. Jay Paap will share three key program features he has found critical to roadmapping adoption.

  1. Motivated map builders – there needs to be a clear benefit to those building the maps, otherwise it is ‘just another exercise’.
  2. Accessible to users - if the roadmaps are not available and user friendly they will not be used.
  3. Pertinent to their purpose – there is no single map architecture that works across and within organizations, be flexible and adaptive when designing your program.